Image from thekitchenshowcase.com

Traditional vs. Transitional Kitchen Design

Every homeowner wants a great kitchen. Not only is it an amazing and profitable selling point, but it also improves your everyday enjoyment. The benefits of living in a home that works for you meets your needs, fits your style, and makes you happy cannot be overstated!

So how can you get that kitchen you’ve always dreamed of? As always, the best thing to do is to start with a plan. What is your preferred style? When you scroll through Pinterest, what kinds of images catch your eye? Are they sleek and streamlined? Or are they rich, detailed, and elegant?

Know Thyself

Believe it or not, knowing what styles you like will help your design evolve. And with so many options to choose from, having a vision before you start planning is always crucial to a good renovation experience.

Your kitchen design team can help you create the perfect plan. But first, you’ll need to help them by narrowing down your choices just a little. Give your kitchen designers an idea of your style preference, what features you want, and how you hope to use it. With these ideas to guide their design, they will then create a result that you’ll love.

Two of the most popular types of kitchen designs are traditional and transitional models. But what are they exactly? Likely, you’ve already seen photos of both of these approaches, but we’ll try our best to clear up any ambiguity.

Traditional Design

When you think of a traditional-style kitchen, perhaps you think of flowery finishes, over-embellished accents, and a general feeling of inaccessibility. But that doesn’t have to be the case! A traditional kitchen can be elegant without feeling stuffy; it’s all about careful coordination.

What defines a traditional kitchen?

Fine Craftsmanship

Image from jfdesigns.co

Image from jfdesigns.co

These kitchens curate a distinctly ornamental look, featuring architectural embellishments and close attention to detail. These detailed elements can adorn various surfaces. Raised or elaborately-carved cabinet panels and soaring, curved lines are great examples of this. Crown molding, corbels, and luxurious furniture pieces give the space a certain air of grandeur.

Luxury Finishings

Image from romerointeriors.co.uk

Image from romerointeriors.co.uk

Natural stone countertops, like marble, granite, and quartz, ooze traditional appeal and elegance. Surface finishes or glazes also give the kitchen a refined, polished look.

Neutral Palette

Image from crismatec.com

Image from crismatec.com

Neutral doesn’t mean beige, but traditional design does tend towards a warmer, more subtle color palette. These include whites and creams, beige, greige, and earthy tones. They can also swing into blacks, greys, and even muted green tones, but these often tend to be accent colors.

Layering

Image from seattletimes.com

Image from seattletimes.com

Layering is used in the traditional kitchen to give a space visual interest, depth, and complexity without overwhelming the design. A traditional kitchen rarely, if ever, has flashy, ostentatious features, bold patterns, and colors, or statement items. They feature elegant, sometimes elaborate adornments that, when combined with simple, classical pieces, gel together to highlight the entirety of the space. The design elements are cohesive and dimensional, without any particular item screaming for attention. 

Transitional Design

Transitional style is a combination of traditional and modern design elements. While traditional designs often feature more contemporary pieces to ensure that ‘classical’ does not equal ‘outdated,’ transitional fully embrace the mixture of old and new. So much so, in fact, that the juxtaposition of tradition and modernity is part of the beauty of this approach.

What exactly is a transitional kitchen?

Clean and Clear

Photo: Zio and Sons Creative

Photo: Zio and Sons Creative

While some homeowners may think traditional styles are too formal and stuffy, the transitional kitchen embraces a more relaxed and casual look. While it still features some of the elements that make a traditional kitchen great, it trades in the former’s extravagant detailing for cleaner, straighter lines, a more simplified approach, and an unfussy appearance. Think flat cabinets, unadorned hardware, and industrial-style kitchen appliances. 

Simple Palette

Image from home-designing.com

Image from home-designing.com

Similar to traditional designs, transitional kitchens tend towards a simplified color palette. However, there is a preference for tones that appear light and airy, rather than warm and earthy. Whites, beiges, and greys are aligned with this palette, and cooler tones are also good choices.

Geometry

Image from homedit.com

Image from homedit.com

Whereas traditional designs are enamored of curves and swirls, transitional kitchens are the ideal canvas for simple lines and a more structured aesthetic. Herringbone and chevron patterns make for beautiful backsplashes, while three-dimensional geometric lighting fixtures set the space off to perfection.

Whether you prefer traditional or transitional design for your kitchen, Foley Companies can give you a beautiful result that you and your family will love. Connect with us today, and let’s get started.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *